The Ultra-importance of Ubiquitous Ultrabroadband

Marcus Weldon is CTO for the Wireline Networks Product Division at Alcatel-Lucent
Marcus Weldon is CTO for the Wireline Networks Product Division at Alcatel-Lucent

It is becoming increasingly apparent that we are approaching the much-vaunted ‘nirvana’ of ubiquitous connectivity to media, content and web services hosted in the Cloud and accessed on any device, anywhere. This is being enabled by the emergence and convergence of key Web/IT technologies (virtualisation and SDN), key networking technologies (IP/MPLS, multi-tenancy) and key devices (tablets, smartphones and low cost/power M2M devices). But two key problems remain: the economics and the access.

These two problems may, on the face of it, seem quite separate, but in fact I will argue that one can’t solve one without solving the other, and moreover, solving the latter may in fact have a direct impact on the former. To put it simply: ultrabroadband access may be ultra-important to uncovering new business models and economics. To understand this, consider two dimensions:

1)      The cloud ‘superhighway’ of media, information and services is a road to nowhere without a ultrafast “on-ramp”.

2)      The economics of cloud services delivery cannot change if the delivery can’t adapt to changing demand, and this requires both ultra-capacity, but also ultra-flexibility and adaptability of the network, including the ultrafast “on-ramp.”

Make sense?

This is what I was talking about at the recent Broadband World Forum in my keynote address.  So, if you want to understand (or debate) “the ubiquitous future and how to get there”, it is ultra-important that you take a look!

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s